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ROLLING STONES SONGS: ‘TERRIFYING’ (1989)

Rolling Stones songs: Terrifying
*Click for 
MORE ROLLING STONES SONGS 1962-PRESENT

I’m faithful as a swan/ I’m darker than a bat/ I’m friendly as a bear/ And tougher than a rat…

Written by: Jagger/Richards
Recorded: Air Studios, Montserrat, March 29-Apr. 1989; Olympic Sound Studios, May 15-June 29 1989
Guest musicians: Chuck Leavell (organ), Roddy Lorimer (trumpet), Matt Clifford (keyboards), Lisa Fischer (backing vocals)
*Data taken from Martin Elliott’s book THE ROLLING STONES COMPLETE RECORDING SESSIONS 1962-2012

From the The Rolling Stones – All the Songs book:
I’m rutting like a goat/I’m horny as a hog… The Glimmer Twins, and Mick
Jagger in particular, resort to animal metaphors to describe the terrifying
love that has overcome them. I get these strange strange strange desires,
sings Jagger to a hypnotic, dance-like beat, reminiscent of the “Hot Stuff”
era. “Terrifying” was released in Europe (including the United Kingdom) in
two main formats: a single (with “Wish I’d Never Met You” as the B-side)
and a maxi single (comprising the 12- and 7-inch remixes, the album
version, and “Wish I’d Never Met You”). Neither managed to enter the
charts.

The Stones give an excellent performance of this highly energetic funk-rock
number. In all likelihood, “Terrifying,” with its relentless groove, came into
being under the influence of Bill Laswell and Nile Rodgers—the producers
of Jagger’s She’s the Boss. The rhythm section is fearsomely efficient, with
Charlie and Bill each making an outstanding contribution. According to
Martin Elliott, Chris Kimsey reports that Michael H. Brauer, the sound
engineer in charge of the mixing, was keen to get the best possible sound
out of Bill’s bass, and he succeeded. It is also interesting to note that Bill is
almost certainly playing his English-made Wal bass. The guitarists are no
less worthy of praise, Keith and Ronnie each playing a superbly funky
rhythm part. It seems to be Woody who takes the one and only solo, which
occurs in the intro, on what is most likely his Stratocaster with fairly
pronounced chorus/phasing. Another important element is Matt Clifford’s
synthesizer. He can be heard producing vibraphone (or celesta) sounds and
coming in with numerous percussion effects (including timbales and
cowbells), probably on a Yamaha DX7. These can be heard from 4:13.
Chuck Leavell, meanwhile, is on organ. Roddy Lorimer of the Kick Horns
plays some very jazzy and entirely appropriate phrases on the trumpet.
Mick delivers a strong vocal take, singing in a low register that is just right
for the song.

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